Few Minutes Away From Ten O’Clock

i

Looking from a window above, it’s like a story of love; can you hear me. [1]

All are busy, all are in their own worlds, in their thoughts.

Oh think twice, ’cause it’s another day for you and me in paradise. [2]

ii

The sun is shining high on the summer sky; rain has been forecasted in eve.

But, we’ve no time for that; we only know the sprint to the made here-I-should-be.

Looking from a window, it’s like a story of love; can you hear me.

iii

The old man is sweating: he’s out of pension; a year he has retired from the job.

No one has time to look at him; asked him are you okay; it’ll be detour from the walk–

Oh think twice, ’cause it’s another day for you and me in paradise

iv

The husband has boarded the bus; his son and wife bidding him; she’ll go to work–

Living the little one at the creche. A tinge of happiness I brushed in to their life.

Looking from a window above, it’s like a story of love; can you hear me.

v

The bank has open as the old man looked at his clock; he wiped his forehead.

His grandchild going to be born tomorrow or next day of ‘morrow–I imagined.

Oh think twice, ’cause it’s another day for you and me in paradise.

vi

The cacophony and the bustling of the morning will slow down.

No one, me too, will remember the old man and the couple.

Looking from a window above, it’s like a story of love; can you hear me.

Oh think twice, ’cause it’s another day for you and me in paradise.


[1] Only You–Enrique Iglesias

[2] Another Day in Paradise–Phil Collins

—xxx—

Written for Day 5 of National/Global Poem Writing Month 2019.

Prompt:

For our daily prompt (optional as always). Today’s prompt comes from another poem by Kyle Dargan, called “Diaspora: A Narcolepsy Hymn.” This poem, like “Call and Response,” is inspired by the work of others – in this case, the poet Morgan Parker, and lyrics from songs by Beyoncé and The Notorious B.I.G. The poem also partakes of one of the most difficult poetic forms, the villanelle.

And to make it an even more virtuoso performance, Dargan’s alternating lines, besides being taken from songs, express “opposing” ideas, with one being about sleeping, and the other waking.

Following Dargan’s lead, today we’d like to challenge you to write a poem that incorporates at least one of the following: (1) the villanelle form, (2) lines taken from an outside text, and/or (3) phrases that oppose each other in some way. If you can use two elements, great – and if you can do all three, wow!

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Published by Sangbad

A poet, an author, a reviewer--in one word I'm a literaturist (means one who is trying almost everything that Literature is made of). My books are available at Amazon. I'm a Bengali, born and raised in Kolkata, West Bengal.

4 thoughts on “Few Minutes Away From Ten O’Clock

  1. oh Sangbad you are the master of the villanelle! i always envy how you curate the words, your form is impeccable to me, it flows and tells a story, unfolding in increments yet with delicate beauty. awesome my friend, just awesome

    Like

    1. After a long time I tried something like this structure poem…but to me this one of the most weakest I had written in recent time…thanks for the appreciation…hope to see you soon…

      Liked by 1 person

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